‘This Constitutes a Mass Grave’: Experts Find Remains In Area Near Site Where Tulsa Race Massacre Victims Are Thought to be Buried

During excavations on Wednesday, Oct. 21, experts discovered the remains of at least 10 people in an unmarked mass grave near the site of the ‘”Original 18″ area where victims of the Tulsa Race Massacre are likely buried. Archaeologists and forensic scientists in Oklahoma began a second excavation on Monday in search of 18 victims of the massacre, who are thought to have been buried in a section of Tulsa’s Oaklawn Cemetery. Officials believe that 18 Black victims, whose names are listed on a ledger at a white-owned funeral home,…

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Tulsa Resumes Excavation to Find ‘Original 18’ Site of 1921 Race Massacre Victims

On Monday, Oct. 19, Oklahoma archeologists and forensic scientists began to excavate an area of a Tulsa cemetery that is thought to be the “Original 18” site, a section of Oaklawn Cemetery believed to be the burial place of 18 Black victims of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. Officials believe 18 Black people whose names are listed on a ledger at a white-owned funeral home may be found in unmarked graves, ones the funeral home never plotted precisely. As many as 300 people died and more than 800 were injured…

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ANALYSIS: Fact-checking claims about service delivery in South Africa since 1994

Did you switch on a light today? Pour yourself a glass of water? Flush the toilet? Access to electricity, water and sanitation are often key measures when assessing progress in a country.  In South Africa there is a common year of reference: 1994. It marked the country’s first democratic election. Politicians have a habit of measuring progress – or lack thereof – from this date. Over the years, Africa Check has fact-checked numerous claims about access to services between 1994 and the present day. Recently an Africa Check reader asked…

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‘Fifth Little Girl’ Injured In 1963 Church Bombing Seeks Restitution, Apology from State of Alabama

Sarah Collins Rudolph is seeking restitution from the state of Alabama more than 50 years after she was injured by a church bombing that killed her sister and three other Black girls. On Sept. 14, a group of lawyers from Jenner & Block LLP sent a letter to Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey requesting an apology and compensation for her ordeal. The law firm decided to represent Rudolph pro bono after a former partner heard her speak in South Carolina last year, according to The Washington Post. Sarah Collins Rudolph (above)…

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Descendants of Tulsa Massacre Victims Seek Reparations in New Lawsuit Against the City

On Tuesday, attorneys representing the victims and descendants of victims of the Tulsa Race Massacre filed a lawsuit against the city of Tulsa. The plaintiffs are seeking reparations nearly 100 years after the city’s iconic Black Wall Street was burned and destroyed by white mobs. Attorney Damario Solomon-Simmons, who is leading the suit, which was filed Sept. 1 in state court, says that much of Tulsa’s spotted racial history emanates from the massacre that killed as many as 300 people. During a 12-hour period between May 31 and June 1,…

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Megan The Stallion Named Revlon’s New Global Ambassador

Megan Thee Stallion is Revlon’s newest Global Brand Ambassador. Megan shared the news on Instagram on Thursday, August 6. She posted photos of herself rocking a full face beat and cute space buns, which were brought to life by celebrity hairstylist Kellon Deryck. She also posted a video to her Instagram Story rocking the glam.… source: https://according2hiphop.com/megan-the-stallion-named-revlons-new-global-ambassador/

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New York’s Bronx Zoo Apologizes For Putting African Man In ‘Monkey House’ More Than 100 Years Ago

The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), which runs New York’s Bronx Zoo, has apologized for its racist past. The WCS issued a statement on Wednesday, in the wake of the zoo’s 125th anniversary celebration, apologizing for its treatment of an African man named Ota Benga. Benga, a man of the Mbuti people — who were once known in the West as “pygmies” — of the modern day Democratic Republic of Congo, was put on display in a “monkey house” for multiple days in September 1906. “First, we apologize for and condemn…

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American Academy of Pediatrics Apologizes Decades After Denying Two Pioneering Black Doctors Membership

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has issued a formal apology for repeatedly denying two Black doctors membership to the academy 80 years ago. Drs. Alonzo deGrate Smith and Roland Boyd Scott, both Black pediatricians, applied to join the AAP in 1939, and they would find themselves repeatedly rejected and denied membership for a period of six years. It wasn’t until 1945 that both doctors gained membership in the academy and became the first Black members of the professional association. The AAP issued a statement on Wednesday, apologizing for this…

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23andMe Genetic Study Found Significant DNA from Present-Day Nigeria, Overrepresentation of European Men In Descendants of Enslaved Africans

A groundbreaking study of the genetics of Black Americans highlighted lesser known aspects of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. The study, Genetic Consequences of the Transatlantic Slave Trade in the Americas, was spearheaded by consumer genetics company 23andMe and compiled genetic results from more than 50,000 volunteers, including 30,000 people of African descent, reported The New York Times. It was published in the American Journal of Human Genetics on Wednesday. A study by 23andMe scientists found unexpectedly high amounts of ancestry from the region that is present-day Nigeria in descendants of…

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