Rwanda: Revenue From Gorilla Tourism Grows By 25%

Revenue from Gorilla trekking in Volcanoes National Park grew by 25 per cent in 2018 to $19.2M from the previous year, latest Rwanda Development Board data indicates. The money was earned from sale of 15,132 gorilla permits during the year. The statistics released by the board yesterday points to a rise in revenue from gorilla trekking after the revision of permits prices from $750 to $1500 in 2016. In 2016 prior to the increase of permit price, 22,219 were sold, raking in $15m in revenue. RDB Chief Tourism Officer Belize…

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Zimbabwe: Popular Lion Seduli Killed by Hunters on World Lion Day

Some of the lions that have been killed by trophy hunters in the region over the last 10 years. Cape Town — A male lion, that was popular with photographers, has been shot by trophy hunters on the outskirts of Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe, Captured in Africa Foundation announced on their Facebook page. According to the post, Seduli, a lion who frequented photographic lodges in and around the national park was killed by hunters on World Lion Day. The foundation says they had regularly published posts about Seduli and…

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Kenya: Extreme Floods, the Key to Climate Change Adaptation in Africa’s Drylands

Turkana County, Kenya — Extreme rainfall and heavy flooding, often amplified by climate change, causes devastation among communities. But new research published on Aug. 7 in the scientific journal Nature reveals that these dangerous events are extremely significant in recharging groundwater aquifers in drylands across sub-Saharan Africa, making them important for climate change adaptation. According to the research, which was led by the University College London (UCL) and Cardiff University, this vital source of water for drinking and irrigation across sub-Saharan Africa is resilient to climate variability and change. “Our…

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Uganda: Water-Saving Potassium Crystal Heralds Hope for Ugandan Farmers

Will a white crystal solve Uganda’s water for agriculture challenges? This is an emerging question following a recent display of this technology during the annual National Agricultural show at Jinja. The annual show themed: Agricultural technologies and innovations for farmer-led agro-industrialisation, showcased technologies ranging from seeds, forage, mechanisation inputs, water retention technologies, value addition and even access to credit. NEW TECHNOLOGY That most crop exhibitors employ mulching as a water retention method was clear, but the use of super absorbent polymer was new. “I have not heard about that technology,…

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South Africa: Preliminary Tests Show Cape Town’s Discoloured Water Not Health Risk

Preliminary tests done on the discoloured water in Cape Town’s distribution system has found it does not pose a health risk, although residents are advised to continue boiling it before use. According to the City of Cape Town, the Faure water treatment plant had received water from the Steenbras Upper Dam as well as the Palmiet River whose water had a naturally occurring “tea” colour caused by the soil structure, fynbos and vegetation. During the treatment process, drinking water is dosed with coagulating chemicals, resulting in natural particles in the…

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Africa: How to Move Towards a More Peaceful Nigeria

Photo: allAfrica Fatima Madaki, one of Nigeria’s peacebuilders (file photo). interview By Nontobeko Mlambo Johannesburg — Fatima Madaki is a young peacebuilder working with Search for Common Ground Nigeria, a non-governmental organization which focuses on peacebuilding in communities where citizens deal with Boko Haram attacks and violence involving Fulani herders and farmers. She speaks with allAfrica.com’s Nontobeko Mlambo about the importance of including youth, women and the media in peacebuilding processes. The role of the youth in peacebuilding The role that young people play is very critical – more importantly…

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South Africa: 29 Cheetah Cubs Rescued From Wildlife Smuggling Trade

Twenty-nine cheetah cubs, destined to be sold as pets, have been rescued from an illegal smuggling trade in Somaliland. The orphaned cubs were confiscated in Somaliland, an area known as the main transit route for cheetahs trafficked out of East Africa, according to a statement by Global animal welfare organisation Four Paws and the Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF). The organisations are calling for donations to assist with the care of the cubs. The cheetah pet trade is thriving due to the high demand of wild animals as status symbol pets,…

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South Africa: Govt Approves Tormin’s Massive West Coast Mining Expansion

By John Yeld Government has given Australian-owned Tormin mine the go-ahead to vastly expand its current extraction of mineral sands on ten additional West Coast beaches and on an inland strip of old beach adjoining the existing mine near Lutzville. It has also condoned illegal activities by the mine, for which its owner Mineral Sands Resources (MSR) was fined R1.25 million, and authorised it to continue them. Both decisions are being strongly contested and formal appeals have already been filed. One of the appellants is environmental justice group, the Centre…

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Africa: How A Sustainability Strategy Could Save The World

guest column By Hope Mwanake Over nine billion tons of plastic waste has been generated in the last five decades with less than 10% recycled globally. The rest pollutes the environment, adversely affecting our air, our water and our soil. The WHO lists heart disease, strokes, respiratory infections, cancer and tuberculosis among the leading causes of deaths globally. Smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, and obesity are all factors that contribute to these, but the biggest cause of these killers is far greater than our individual lifestyles. c; particularly reducing people’s ability…

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Africa: Researchers Pick Best Spots to Replant Rain Forests

By Michael Taylor Kuala Lumpur — Researchers have identified swathes of lost tropical rainforests as the best places to replant trees, hoping to redress some of the damage done by deforestation and limit climate change. A four-year study used high-resolution satellite imagery to pinpoint more than 100 million denuded hectares (247 million acres) – from South Sudan to Brazil and India – that would deliver good results if reforested. “Globally, more than half of the tropical forests in the world are gone – most of that in the last 50…

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