Four facts you need to know about ancient Egypt’s most hated pharaoh Akhenaten

Ask anyone about Egypt and they are likely to mention the pharaohs and the pyramids. It is the least all curious minds know about the ancient civilisation. You could be forgiven for thinking all the activities over the millennia were simply lying in wait for our age to learn. You would find it a bit odd that ancient Egyptians tried to bury the memory of one of its pharaohs. Akhenaten was that pharaoh. The more interesting angle to his story is that he was perhaps the most radically different to…

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Mozambique: Students Leave for Medical Training in Cuba

Maputo — Eleven young Mozambicans are travelling on Wednesday to Cuba where they will study medicine under an accord reached between the Mozambican and Cuban governments covering education. The medical degree courses began last year following agreements reached during a three day visit by President Filipe Nyusi to the Caribbean island in 2017. The scholarships are paid for by the Mozambican state and include a maintenance grant covering living expenses, transport, tuition fees and other costs. Speaking at a farewell ceremony, the Deputy Minister of Science, Technology, and Higher, Technical…

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Africa: Why Africans Were Shocked By the Pictures From Sochi

On a continent desperate to ‘silence the guns’, images of officials admiring new weapons raise many questions. Scenes of African officials in Russia testing and gazing at sophisticated weapons, with visible exhilaration, circulated online during the Russia-Africa Summit in Sochi on 23 and 24 October. Countries have the sovereign right to buy arms for national defence purposes, but the pictures nevertheless raise concerns. What are the implications of bringing more arms to a continent already awash with weapons and caught in the grip of armed violence and instability in many…

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(Anti-)Imperialism, Knowledge Production, and Political Economy

*This post is part of our online roundtable on Adom Getachew’s Worldmaking after Empire: The Rise and Fall of Self-Determination Michael Manley, Prime Minister of Jamaica, and First Lady Rosalynn Carter, 1977 (US National Archives) In Worldmaking after Empire: The Rise and Fall of Self-Determination, Adom Getachew brilliantly explicates anticolonial nationalism as a project of worldmaking emanating from histories of imperialism, racial hierarchy, and unequal integration into the capitalist world-system. Reading against dominant literature in international relations and political theory, the author challenges claims that anticolonial critics like W.E.B. Du Bois, Nnamdi Azikiwe, George…

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US$4.5 billion Mid-East destination wedding tourism, a key trend defining region’s hospitality industry, says new ATM report

5% of destination weddings take place in the Middle East with the UAE the most favoured location EWAA tourism, as well as solo and female-led travel, also set to define hospitality industry as we look ahead to 2020 and beyond Destination wedding tourism, as well as solo and female, led travel and ecotourism, wellness, adventure and agritourism (EWAA) are defining the hospitality industry landscape, according to data released ahead of Arabian Travel Market 2020 (ATM), which takes place at Dubai World Trade Centre from Sunday 19 – Wednesday 22 April…

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First bodies of UK truck victims arrive in Vietnam for burial

The first remains of the 39 people found dead in a truck in Britain last month arrived in Vietnam early Wednesday, capping a weeks-long wait by families eager to bury their loved ones. Sixteen bodies arrived on a Vietnam Airlines commercial flight from London to Hanoi, where they were met at the airport by waiting ambulances and security personnel. They were quickly shuttled away en route to their home provinces in central Vietnam, where relatives anxiously awaited their arrival. “We have been waiting for this moment for very long time.…

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